Aiming for single use plastic free 2020 - Mia Hadrill
Plastic is a genius material that also does a lot of good. The problem is our single use disposable culture, how we use it, the increasing volume, and where it is ending up via inefficient or non-existent waste collection systems.
Microplastics, plastic, pollution, ocean, litter, health, single use, ocean.
425
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-425,single-format-standard,qode-social-login-1.0,qode-restaurant-1.0,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,select-theme-ver-4.5,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.5.2,vc_responsive
Refill Station Bangkok

Aiming for single use plastic free 2020

I welcomed 2020 on the top of a mountain, watching the sunset and contemplating the year ahead. Warning this text contains plastic ranting.

Over the past two weeks, I have seen the effects of our plastic pollution crisis. There’s plastic in our oceans, littered all through the countryside, forests, world heritage sites, wildlife reserves — also, I’ve even witnessed monkeys and dogs playing with discarded plastic. Despite it being a beautiful experience to welcome in the new year at the very top of this stunning mountain, dishearteningly, there were still traces of litter there too. 

Plastic is not my enemy. It’s an amazing material that, despite having many downsides, also has a lot of positive qualities too. The problem is our single use disposable culture, how we use it, the increasing volume, and where it is ending up via inefficient or non-existent waste collection systems. Microplastics are being broken down into smaller and smaller pieces. Millions of animals are killed each year, and who knows when we will find out if it’s possibly harming human health.

Until this is fixed at a global level, I don’t want to contribute to it any more than I have to. This is a global problem. Via ocean currents, plastic is being washed up from one country to another place across the world. For example, scientists found plastic items from Russia, the United States, Europe, South America, Japan, and China in the remote Henderson Island, which is located halfway between Chile and New Zealand. 

In 2020, I will document how I live while aiming to be completely plastic-free over the next 365 days. I am not perfect, but I want to learn. I want to be transparent about the areas I struggle in, get advice, and share what I learn along the way.- or when things mess up. 

I am not a person who lives under a rock. I have a hectic work and social life. It’s not going to be easy, but I know that we can all do better.

You can follow my honest journey on @aimplasticfree or get involved #plasticfree365 #aimplasticfree.

Wishing you a very Happy New Year!

Mia Hadrill

hello@aimplasticfree.com
No Comments

Post a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.